Day Trips in Italy Hiking in Italy Lake Garda Veneto

Rocca di Garda – Hiking to the Best Panoramic Spot of Lake Garda, Italy

Rocca di Garda - Hiking to the Best Panoramic Spot of Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Rocca di Garda is a large flat-top hill that overlooks two of the most beautiful towns on the shores of Lake Garda.

With the town of Bardolino on the left and Garda Town on the right, Rocca di Garda commands stunning views of what is Italy’s largest lake. 

Reaching the top of the hill is a great hike to do on a clear sunny day. Unobstructed, the eyes travel far over the blue expanse of Lake Garda and the lush mountains that surround it. The red rooftops of the two towns down below add a nice contrast to the blues and greens of the landscape. Vineyards grow in perfectly straight lines up the slopes of the nearby hills and white yachts sit prettily on the calm waters of the lake.

Garda Town seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

At the same time, Rocca di Garda is not just a pretty spot with Lake Garda’s best panoramic views. 

Its strategic position overlooking the lake has been attracting human activity since the Bronze Age. In the 5th century AD, a fortress was built there by the Germanic Lombards. It soon became a lively administrative centre. Its importance was such that it gave Italy’s largest lake the name that it carries to this day – Garda. 

Bardolino seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Garda comes from the ancient Germanic term Warda or Warte meaning place of observation, guarding place, or fortress. By the start of the 8th century, this new name had begun to supplant the lake’s Latin name – Benacus. 

Curiously enough, the Italian word for fortress, rocca, gave the hill its current name – Rocca di Garda.

Even though the ancient fortress on its hilltop is no more, Rocca di Garda looks like a fortified place itself to this day. It stands proudly above the lakeside towns and the lake like a guard who is always on his post.

Rocca di Garda seen from Garda Town - Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

So, if you’ve been wanting to do a relatively easy yet totally exciting hike around Lake Garda, look no more. The hike to the top of Rocca di Garda gives you the historic reference, the manageable path, and above all the most stunning views this side of Italy you’ve been dreaming of.

Garda Town seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

As such, in this blog post, I will share with you extensive details and many photos to help put Rocca di Garda on the shores of Lake Garda in the Veneto, Italy on your hiking wishlist.

For a truly amazing hike, though, please, read the warning below in full and keep it in mind when you are on the path. Thank you!

Now let’s start!

 

 

Rocca di Garda – Hiking to the Best Panoramic Spot of Lake Garda, Italy

 

 

Warning!!!

Warning sign - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Please, read this warning carefully and fully before attempting this hike! 

The Rocca di Garda hike is very enjoyable and it allows you to see for yourself some of the most stunning panoramic views of Lago di Garda – Italy’s largest lake.

However, Rocca di Garda is a high, flat-top hill with almost vertical slopes on three sides and there are no safety barriers along the edges of the hilltop.

Upon reaching the top of Rocca di Garda, you will find yourself in a lush meadow and the abyss begins where the meadow ends. High grasses, trees, and shrubs may blur visual perceptions so mind your step and be careful how close to the edge you get.

Kids, especially, may be very tempted to simply run around to let some steam off after the uphill hike. Please, make sure that you stay close to kids at all times and, if need be, hold them by the hand. 

The panoramic views are stunning. Still, please, don’t be tempted to go near the edge in order to take better photos. The slope is very steep and it starts suddenly. One strong gust of wind, one misguided step can be fatal. 

A view of Lake Garda with the marina of Garda Town - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

All the photos you see in this blog post were taken by me standing two meters away from the edge at all times. I used a telescopic lens to bring the landscape closer to me instead of stepping closer to the edge myself. 

The entrance to a tunnel in the rocks - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Another thing to keep in mind is that when you approach the summit of Rocca di Garda, you will start coming across human-sized holes in the rocks by the path. These appear to be former entrances to a derelict system of grottoes/tunnels cut in the rock. It is expressly forbidden to go near or inside them as they are not safe. 

Once again, I used my telescopic lens to photograph them.

Be aware that while there are small warning signs everywhere advising in three languages – Italian, English, and German – against entering the old grottoes and standing too close to the edge, all signs that I saw were defaced making them at times rather difficult to read.

All in all, you need to use common sense at all times when doing this hike. Don’t attempt it on days with reduced visibility and/or windy or otherwise bad weather.

 

 

What is Rocca di Garda?

Lake Garda with Punta di San Vigilio - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Rocca di Garda is a high hill with a flat top that overlooks two of Lake Garda’s prettiest towns Bardolino to the left and Garda Town to the right. 

Covered with lush vegetation, the hill has a rather dramatic appearance and figures in all iconic images of this corner of Italy’s largest lake.

Rocca di Garda is 283 m high and opens stunning panoramic views over Lake Garda. From its top, you can admire a bird’s-eye view of both Bardolino and Garda Town, the marinas of both towns, the romantic Punta San Vigilio, the nearby hills and mountains, and in the distance you can glimpse the charming town of Sirmione.

Standing on top of Rocca di Garda, the eye travels fast and far. It follows the gently curved lines of the lakeshore and takes in the dramatic outlines of the jagged mountains that line the lake on its western shore.

With its strategic position and affording endless heart-stopping views, Rocca di Garda has been attracting people since the Bronze Age. Numerous traces of life during Roman and medieval times have been excavated there during the archaeological studies of the hill.

Remnants of centuries-old fortress - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

In the 5th century, a fortress with a thick defensive wall was built on the hilltop. It became an important administrative centre under the Lombards who were ruling the area at the time.

With its hilltop position, the fortress was practically unassailable. It was surrounded on three sides by steep natural cliffs while the large defensive wall was protecting the easter slope of Rocca di Garda. At the end of the 12th century, the fortress was ceded to the town of Verona in exchange for 700 silver coins. In the 13th century, the fortress was destroyed by its own defenders for unknown reasons.

 

 

What to See at/from Rocca di Garda?

Garda Town seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

People of any age and any hiking ability walk to the top of Rocca di Garda to see for themselves the stunning panoramic views over Lake Garda and several small towns on its shores.

Rocca di Garda is easily Lake Garda’s best panoramic spot for it gives you the opportunity to admire both the lake as a natural environment and the human activity around it.

Red rooftops and white yachts grab the eye among a landscape of lush mountains and still blue waters.

The town of Bardolino is on the left-hand side of the hill.

Bardolino seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Garda Town is on its right.

Garda Town seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

And Sirmione is a blue mirage across the lake’s expanse.

Sirmione seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

On the hill’s summit, you will also come across the remnants of the ancient fortress that was originally built there in the 5th century AD.

A still-standing after all those centuries castle wall here, low-laying remains of the formerly mighty defensive wall there. Spiny shrubs and creepers keep the old stones in a tight embrace. Thick grasses grow at their base threatening to disbalance their fragile foundations at a moment’s notice.

Remnants of a centuries-old defensive wall - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

The ruins are quite interesting to see as they give you an idea of what happens to things created by man if left unattended and without a caring hand for several centuries.

The path leading to the Eremo dei Camaldolesi - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Another point of interest you can see as part of your Rocca di Garda hike is the Eremo San Giorgio – a monastic community of the Benedictine order of the Camaldolese. Halfway through the forest part of the hike, you will see a sign pointing the way to the hermitage. Apparently, it takes about 15 mins from there to reach it.

As we didn’t do this particular detour, I can’t give you first-hand information about it. In any case, if you decide to do it, please, have a look at the hermitage’s official website to gather information when and how it is best to visit in order to show maximum respect to the monastic community living there. 

 

 

How to Reach Rocca di Garda?

The hiking path at the top of the hill - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

You will find Rocca di Garda on the eastern edge of Italy’s largest lake – Lago di Garda. This steep flat-top hill is just past the pretty town of Bardolino and right next to the beautiful Garda Town. In fact, the busy road which connects the two towns curves around the hill’s wide base.

Rocca di Garda is in the area of Lake Garda that makes part of the Northern Italian region of the Veneto.

By car, you can easily reach Rocca di Garda from anywhere in the Veneto, more so from the nearby large city of Verona and the slightly further afield cities of Vicenza, Padua, and Venice. The hill is easy to reach, too from the western side of Lake Garda which is part of the region of Lombardy. Or you can travel to it from the lake’s top end which is part of the Autonomous Province of Trentino.   

Views of the surrounding hills during the hike - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

If you are travelling by public transport, then you can take a train from Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Venice, Brescia, or Milan to either Peschiera del Garda or Desenzano del Garda. These are two larger towns on the shores of Lake Garda that have well-served train stations. Once there, you can either take a bus to Garda Town or use one of the ferries that crisscross the lake to take you there. The latter option will also give you a chance to enjoy the dramatic view of Rocca di Garda overlooking Bardolino and Garda Town as the ferry approaches your destination.

Once in Garda Town, you can either walk from the historic centre to the top of Rocca di Garda (there are signs pointing the way) or (and if travelling by car) you can park at different places around town or right next to the hiking path’s start and begin your ascent from there. 

 

 

How to Do the Rocca di Garda Hike?

The path through the forest - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

There are various points around Garda Town from which to start your hike to the top of Rocca di Garda.

Some people do the hike beginning their walk all the way from the town’s historic centre. There are signs pointing the way and for the first half of the hike, you will need to walk through town and in close proximity to houses and roads.

The sign at the car park area - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Other hikers use the tiny parking area right at the end of Via degli Alpini (45°34’17.7″N 10°42’49.2″E) which is marked by the informational board pictured above. From there they follow the path through the forest all the way to the hilltop.

If you can’t find a parking space at the end of Via degli Alpini (as the parking spots there are very few), you can try searching for nearby car parks and then you can start your walk from there. 

I can roughly divide the hiking path that starts from the end of Via degli Alpini in three parts:

The start of the gravel path of the hike - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

  • Gravel and dirt path – it curves through the forest and goes uphill. Your advance is helped by the steps that have been shaped in the gravel and dirt with the help of wooden stakes and boards. There are a couple of benches scattered along the path to help you catch your breath.

The rocky path - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

  • Stone path – it begins right after the sharp curve which you will see once you have walked past the detour leading to the Eremo San Giorgio. Here the inclination gets a little bit steeper and you will be walking on what looks like stratified stones or large flat rocks. They have many ridges and bumps so it’s important to keep your step steady at all times.

The meadow on the hilltop - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

  • Meadow path – right at Rocca di Garda’s top, you will come across a small pretty meadow. A small path cut across the meadow to the most gorgeous views of Garda Town and Punta San Vigilio. Another path leads halfway around the meadow giving you a chance to enjoy Bardolino and Sirmione from the hilltop. The path then takes you through a small forested area where you will see the ancient fortress’ remains. It then loops back to the stone path from where you can hike back following the same path as on the way up.  

 

 

What Do You Need to Do the Rocca di Garda Hike?

A view of Lake Garda with Punta di San Vigilio - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Hiking shoes with a good grip are a must! You will be walking on both gravel and uneven stones with many ridges and bumps. Plus, at the very top, the path goes very close to the edge of the steep high hill. You need to be able to control each step, to avoid slips, and to keep your feet straight and safe.

Comfortable clothes will make your hiking experience so much more enjoyable and safe.

In addition, bring water and, if you want, some light snacks or a packed lunch.

On a sunny day, suncream is a must, especially on the hilltop where you will find yourself directly exposed to the sun. A bug repellent may come in handy, too.

For tips on how to prepare for a hike in Italy, please, read this interview with an expert hiker.

 

 

Who is the Rocca di Garda Hike Suitable for?

A bench in a clearing along the path - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

In principle, the hike to the top of Rocca di Garda is suitable for hikers of all abilities. Strictly speaking, the elevation is not big – about 280 m – but the path goes relentlessly up, so take your time, if you need, and make use of the benches that have been placed at a couple of spots along the way should you want to catch your breath. 

The return is easy as the path goes down all the way. Still, please, mind your step, especially on the rocky portion of the path as it is very bumpy.

A colourful bug on a white wildflower - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

If you attempt the hike with children, please, be prepared to keep an eye on them at all times, above all on the flat hilltop. The slopes are vertical and very high. There are no safety barriers so utmost and constant caution is needed! 

Both Rocca di Garda and the hike to its top are very popular locally. While not overrun with people and for most of the time offering complete peace and quiet, usually, you will never be too far away from other people on the path and on the hilltop. On weekends, you may see families picnicking on top of the hill, groups of teenagers and University students chatting up there, people walking their dogs, serious hikers dressed up in professional gear as well as groups of friends in daily wear who have decided to attempt the hike after a lavish lunch. 

You will be surrounded by nature at all times yet, it feels close to civilisation, too.

 

 

When Is the Best Time to Do the Rocca di Garda Hike?

Garda Town seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

On a clear day! This way you will enjoy the best lake views and will be able to see in minute detail several of Lake Garda’s most famous towns and sights: Bardolino, Garda Town, Sirmione, Punta San Vigilio, and the long chain of mountains on the western side of Italy’s largest lake. 

Avoid going up there on days with reduced visibility and/or bad weather. The top of the hill is flat, its slopes are incredibly steep and there are no safety barriers of any kind along the hill’s perimeter. You need to be alert at all times when close to the sheer drop.

 

 

My Personal Experience Hiking to the Top of Rocca di Garda

A view of Lake Garda with Punta di San Vigilio - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

I loved doing the Rocca di Garda hike. It was a gorgeous sunny day with a bit of a breeze, the views were spectacular, and the historical link was rivetting.

Plus, we were lucky to be able to park right next to the start of the path.

The road up to the small parking area at the end of Via degli Alpini was uphill and it curved through suburban streets. At one point it felt like we had reached the end of the road. Around us was a small cluster of houses with, seemingly, no way forward and with nowhere to park. Just as we were about to turn back, a kind man who was enjoying the nice weather in his blooming garden, pointed ahead and said: ‘Keep driving on! There is more!’

So, we did!

Once we reached the small car park, there was only one space left. It was just past the rubbish bins but it felt like such good luck to have it for our car.

Hiking boots on, we started on the path. It’s the one that goes up from the parking area, not the one that continues flat from it. The steps stuck in the gravel and dirt path really helped me on the way up.

Trees along the path - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

The forest provided a lovely shade and it was very lush and green around us.

Brown butterfly - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

We stopped several times to look at different bugs and butterflies and a few more times for me to catch my breath as we were walking uphill all the time.

Soon, we bypassed the detour to the Eremo di San Giorgio. Just a few steps up from it the stone path began.

A hole in the rock - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Here we noticed a large hole in the rocks and upon approaching it we spotted the sign expressly forbidding entry. The sign is small and defaced just like all the other warning signs positioned along the hike. Still, please, do pay them heed as they do warn you about dangerous spots along the path and on the hilltop.

A group of young people with a dog in front of us left the main stone path and scaled the ridge to our left-hand side and then continued through the forest. We followed suit.

A sign pointing the path forward - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

On top of the ridge, we found a narrow path and a sign that said: Walking Path.

So, we followed the arrow!

The path along the remnants of the old defensive wall - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Soon, we found ourselves right next to the low-lying remains of the centuries-old defensive wall. A lizard was sunning itself on it, its green colours perfectly camouflaging it among the bunch of creeper plants and grasses that had taken over the ruins.

Bardolino seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Suddenly, through the tree branches, a gorgeous view of Bardolino revealed itself. For once, we felt like birds!

As we don’t have wings though and as the path from this point onwards seemed to get really narrow, overgrown with brambles, and literally on the edge of the hill, we retraced our steps and joined the main stone path again.

The view from the hiking path - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

We walked further up, enjoying the views of the mountains that surround Garda Town like an amphitheatre. Lush vines planted in perfect lines grew on sunny terraces up the hills. Rooftops could be glimpsed through the branches down there bellow. The sky provided just the perfect clouds to make the view very dramatic.

A split in the rocks - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

In the meantime, on our left-hand side, there were a couple more of those strange human-size holes and even what appeared to be a split in the rocks. They seemed to lead into grottoes or tunnels. Again, we stood safely away from them although our imagination was fired and we wondered aloud about what they were used for by the people who had lived on Rocca di Garda so many centuries ago.

We reached the summit and jumped over a tree that had fallen right across the path. A few more steps and we walked out of the forest onto a sunny meadow covered with long grass. The path cut right through the meadow and we could see people sunbathing and picnicking around its edges.

A moth on a white flower - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

A colourful moth caught my attention on a small bloom. It posed like a top model so I snapped it while it fed on the flower’s sweet nectar.

There were more flowers spread through the tall grass but, to be honest, I didn’t dare walk close to them. I have several phobias at the back of my head at all times and I wasn’t going to test my limits by running through long grass.

Plus, we were there for the views!

A view of Lake Garda with Punta di San Vigilio - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

And the views were splendid. Right at the end of the path, a gorgeous panorama opened in front of our charmed eyes. Down below stood Garda Town – a glamourous place with its bay, yachts, and colourful houses. Further away we could make every curve of the stone quays that stretch into the water from the Punta San Vigilio – a romantic promontory with a famous restaurant.

It was beautiful!

I snapped my photos with the utmost attention paid to the distance I left between myself and the edge of the cliff. The drop was no joke.

Then, we followed the path, this time curving around the meadow, and came across more groups of young Italian people relaxing in the sun and enjoying the views of Bardolino down below. 

Bardolino seen from above - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

The powerful yachts in Bardolino’s marina looked like tiny toys created by an incredibly skilled miniaturist.

From there, the path took us through the forest again, letting us discover the ruined walls of what once had been an important fortress.

Remnants of a centuries-old defensive wall - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

It was quite sobering to see. To think that the fortress that gave Italy’s largest lake its name – Garda – nowadays serves as a support for brambles and trees put into a sharp perspective what happens to things built by people when no care is taken of them. 

How fragile is everything we build! How many emotions we invest in every little thing! And then Time, with a snap of its long fingers, reduces it all down to ruins lost in a forest.

Pink wildflowers - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

While ascending the hill had taken us a good hour for we had stopped so many times along the path, the descent was squashed in about half an hour.

Once back to the car, it felt so good to have been up there on Rocca di Garda, to have seen the stunning panoramic views from its top, to have gotten close to its ruins and history. Now, however, it was time to head away to other sights and places of interest along Lake Garda’s shores for there is always so much to see and do there that time’s never enough. 

 

 

What Else to Do in the Vicinity of Rocca di Garda?

Lake Garda with Kids Or the Best 11 Things to Do at Lake Garda for Families - rossiwrites.com

Hiking to the top of Rocca di Garda is a great way to spend a couple of hours on a nice sunny morning or a breezy afternoon. Add to this timeframe another hour or two if you want to spend some moments on the hilltop admiring the stunning views and even topping up your tan.

Yet, there are many more wonderful and exciting things to do and sights to see in the immediate vicinity of Rocca di Garda. Pick one or more suggestions from the shortlist below for an action-packed day of getting to know up close and personal the beauty of this corner of Italy.

Please, note that all travel times are approximate, by car, and start from the bottom of Rocca di Garda.

Garda Town – under 5 mins away. Go for a nice walk through Garda Town’s lovely historic centre. Don’t miss the Palazzo dei Capitani in the Venetian Gothic style, the Museum of the Territory of Garda, and the whimsical Villa Albertini. 

Bardolino – under 5 mins away. Famous for its wine, Bardolino is a town with a rich history, cute historic centre, several churches dating back to the 11th-12th centuries, and 12th-century defensive walls.  You can, actually, walk all the way from Bardolino to Garda Town and back by following the long lakeside promenade allowing you to enjoy even more stunning views of Lake Garda while keeping fit.  

Punta San Vigilio – under 10 mins away. One of the most romantic spots on the shores of Lake Garda. This is a long cypress-lined strip of land that separates the southern part of the lake from its central narrower part. 

Other Towns on the Shores of Lake Garda – Rocca di Garda is within a very easy reach from a number of cute and picturesque lakeside towns. Some of them are: Lasize, Peschiera del Garda, Sirmione, Desenzano del Garda, Torri del Benaco, and Malcesine. To read more about them and find out what to see and do in each one of them, please, read this blog post: Best 12 Towns to Visit Around Lago di Garda – Italy’s Largest Lake.

Amusement and Aventure Parks – between 15 and 45 mins away. Several of Italy’s largest and most popular amusement and adventure parks are right next to Lake Garda. Have a look at their official websites for further details: Gardaland, Gardaland Sea Life Aquarium, Canevaworld, Busatte Adventure, and Jungle Adventure Park.

Hike to Crero’s Tibetan Bridge – under 20 mins away. Crero is a small picturesque village in the lush hills above Lake Garda. Once reached, you can leave your car there and then hike to a dramatic Tibetan Bridge which affords heartstopping views of Lake Garda. The hike from Crero to the bridge takes about 30 to 40 mins one way. For full information how to hike to Lake Garda’s Tibetan bridge, please, read this blog post: Lake Garda’s Tibetan Bridge – A High-Adrenaline Hiking Experience in the Veneto, Italy

Hike to Campo di Brenzone – under 25 mins away. Campo di Brenzone is a 1,000 years old medieval village in the lush hills above Lake Garda. To reach it, you need to park your car in Marniga – a small lakeside community – and then you need to hike following centuries-old mule tracks weaving through olive groves. For full information on how to do this hike, please, read this blog post: Campo di Brenzone – A Great Day Trip to a Medieval Village in the Hills Above Lake Garda, Italy

Sanctuary of Santa Corona – under 30 mins away. An important Christian sanctuary the main church of which is half-hewn in the rocky face of a steep cliff. For full information on how to visit this memorable place, please, read this blog post: Sanctuary of Madonna della Corona – Visiting Italy’s Church Suspended Between Heaven and Earth

Parco delle Cascate and Molina – under 40 mins away. A beautiful nature park nestled between three lush valleys. It is surrounded by dramatic peaks and it is famous for its 18 waterfalls. Next door to the park, is the medieval village of Molina with its centuries-old water mills. For full information on how to visit this stunning place and the adjacent village, please, read this blog post: Parco delle Cascate and Molina – A Great Day Out in the Province of Verona

Verona – under 40 mins away. The city of Romeo and Juliet, Verona is a great place to explore while in the Northern Italian region of the Veneto. For full information about all the unmissable things to tick off here in a day, please, read this blog post: 20 Best Things to Do and See in Verona, Italy in One Day – The Ultimate Itinerary with Photos and Tips

 

 

In Conclusion

A view of Lake Garda with the marina of Garda Town - Rocca di Garda, Lake Garda, Italy - rossiwrites.com

Rocca di Garda is a high steep hill providing the best panoramic views of Italy’s largest lake – Lago di Garda.

Standing between the town of Bardolino and Garda Town on the Veneto’s shore of the lake, Rocca di Garda is a great place to hike to the top of on a sunny and clear day. You will enjoy some truly stunning views of the lake, of some of the lakeshore towns, and of the surrounding mountains.

In addition, you will come across remnants of a 5th-century Lombard fortress which up until the 13th century had been a lively administrative centre on top of Rocca di Garda. Its importance was such that Lake Garda owes its current name to it. Garda is based on the ancient Germanic word warda or warte meaning a place of observation, a guarding place, or a fortress.

Going strictly uphill on the way to the top and then strictly downhill on the way back, the hike to Rocca di Garda is not difficult to do. The main issue comes on the flat hilltop as there are no protective barriers on the edge and the drop is steep.

Please, exercise caution and common sense at all times when doing this hike, especially on the hilltop and around the centuries-old remains of fortifications and walls.

The above blog post provides extensive information about how to do this hike and what precautions to take.

I hope that you will enjoy hiking Rocca di Garda and that the views you will enjoy from its top will stay forever in your heart.  

 

 

More Helpful Links for Nature Walks, Fabulous Hikes and Unforgettable Day Trips in Italy

 

 

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About the author

Rossi

Rossi

Hello! I am Rossi - a Bulgarian currently living in Italy after a 14-year stint in England. This is my blog about my life in these three countries, travels around Europe and opinions about the world we live in. For regular updates, please, subscribe to my newsletter and follow me on social media online. You can also get in touch via the Contacts form or by commenting on the articles in my blog.

2 Comments

  • Hi Rossi,
    enjoyed your article on La Roca di Garda.I visit Bardolino every year, actually I was booked to go there this very week, and I always enjoy a walk out to La Roca. I have never ventured to Eremo San Giorgio and I had planned to do it this summer. Never mind there is always next year as I have amended my travel plans this year. I always walk from Bardolino, it’s a nice walk along the lake to a gap in the hedge were a footpath takes you out to the main road, after crossing the road following the signs to La Roca a path then leads up into the hills and eventually meets the path coming up from Garda and the marker to Eremo.I always enjoy the views, taking time to recover from the climb before dropping down to Garda for refreshment and lunch.Then it’s a nice walk back to Bardolino along the lake.
    Nice article on cheese, unfortunately cheese and I don’t agree!!
    Keep strong and safe, we’re getting there.

    • Thank you very much for your kind words and for this excellent description of the hike to the Eremo San Giorgio!
      I hope that by next year things are going to get back to normal in terms of travel and your Italy trip can happen then smoothly.
      Thank you again and

      Best wishes from me 🙂

      Rossi

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